Boundaries

Reflections

What is a ‘boundary’? A boundary is as a property line with the obvious sign, “No Trespassing.” My land ends here and yours starts from there. One may wish boundaries in relationships were that clear.

Boundaries are very subtle and invisible. So they are confusing. Also, the definition of it varies depending on the person who interprets it. They are very contextual as well. If the situation is not recorded simultaneously, the interpretation could be different between a participant engaged in the context and a third person who listens to the participant’s descriptions only. Although they seem very complex for a lot of us to explain at times, they surely exist as distinctive areas at work and they certainly function in work relationships by setting the limits of one another’s behaviors, speech acts, and body language.

Violation and invasion occur when participants in the context do not share agreed terms in setting their boundaries. Usually, those agreed terms are stipulated in the code of conduct. Even then, all specific situations are not included in it so only the participants can start a conversation to set up the boundaries and to agree in each working relationship. That is how it works in reality according to my personal experiences. And there is not course teaching how to do it in Toronto yet.

Boundary setting is one of the most crucial skills at work one should be equipped with at North American workplaces yet many ESL instructors cross those boundaries and create tension in relationships at work. And they WASTE their energy paying too much attention to that tension. It is the counter effect of the ‘close attention’ at work that one can use to be more productive to help themselves and others. Examples of boundary invasion and the suggested steps to establish them in a working relationship will be discussed further.

Lessons you can watch online

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Sandy Millin

For a lot of teachers, it can be hard to find the time or the opportunity to observe and learn from other teachers’ lessons. If that’s you, hopefully you’ll find these videos useful.

I’ve divided them into loose categories, with a sentence or two to help you decide which are the most relevant to you. Within the categories, they’re just in the order I found them! I’d like to thank the many people who’ve sent me links to these videos over the years (though unfortunately I can’t remember exactly who sent me what!)

Please feel free to tell me about other videos I may have missed in the comments, as well as any broken links. I’d particularly appreciate any VYL, YL or teen videos that may be out there, though I know they may be hard to find.

P.S. I’ll admit that I haven’t watched all of these from start…

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Review of Classroom Community Builders: Activities for the First Day & Beyond

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ELT Rants, Reviews, and Reflections

It’s September (already!?) and lots of people are starting new terms and school years. It’s a good time to think about icebreakers and also consider stepping away from the same old first day of class ideas. I find it very easy to get stuck with such activities but also feel rewarded when I try something new or return to something I haven’t done in a while. The new book, Classroom Community Builders: Activities for the First Day & Beyond by Walton Burns from Alphabet Publishing could be a useful one for teachers in the same situation. Please find my review of the book below below. 

I should mention, in the interests of full disclosure, Walton sent me an advance copy of his book and asked me for comments. He is also a nice guy, a passionate educator, and a fellow Nutmegger. 

walton book.jpg

I once worked in a language academy where first day…

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Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries; Spread the Word; The Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries Blog

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https://oxfordlearnersdictionariesblog.com/2017/06/29/biscotti/

Word of the Month

Biscotti

Lee Blaylock Food StylistHave you ever found yourself in a restaurant or café, having made your choice but facing the embarrassment of not knowing how to pronounce it? Menus in English are often peppered withwords borrowed from different languages; after all, just like our language, our cuisine draws oninfluences from throughout the world. And like the food itself, the words have become anglicizedas our prowess in foreign languages falls a little short of our multilingual neighbours.

To the chagrin (or bemusement) of Italian speakers, ordering a panini is far from the only time we misuse foreign food words. An example soon to be added to OALD online in this category is biscotti – but the Oxford English Corpus quotes ‘I grabbed a latté and a biscotti’, a faux pasnot uncommon among native English speakers. Both biscotti and panini are plural nouns in the original Italian, but even English plurals can be a source of inaccuracies, and can be found with a scattering of decorative apostrophes on menus and signs, so it is hardly surprising that we stumble over asking for bruschetta – is it /bruˈʃetə/ or /bruˈsketə/? You’re less likely to be understood in English-speaking countries if you pronounce it correctly, /bruˈsketə/. And what’s worse, you risk looking rather pedantic.

And this risk isn’t limited to ordering food – perhaps at your next coffee klatch with friends you might stumble over what to drink, too. If you search for latte in OALD, it will redirect you to caffè latte, which would be understood in Italy. But in English-speaking countries it has become the norm to ask for a latte (pronounced by most /ˈlɑːteɪ/), which might confuse an Italian. Why would a fully-grown adult just be ordering milk? But not only this; sometimes we go even further in our attempts to be exotic, adding superfluities such as the accent you might have noticed sneaking in above (‘I grabbed a latté…’).

Ironically, we seem to think this lends more authenticity to a foreign word. Here’s another example from the Oxford English Corpus:

There’s a salsa bar of sorts from which you can choose your heat, from mild to habañero. The place feels authentic.

Well, perhaps it feels authentic to those who don’t know that Habanero has no tilde – but maybe the confusion comes from the similarity to jalapeños, which, like fajitas and tacos, English speakers make a good stab at pronouncing authentically. Having taught modern foreign languages to secondary school students, I became more aware of this rather endearing tendency to pop an accent on a word to make it seem less like an English word whose translation has been guessed at. Or we go to the other extreme and treat foreign borrowings as English, such as adding the regular ending to make the French past participle sauté an English one, to make sautéed potatoes.

And speaking of confusion, a recent TV cookery competition in the UK sparked debate (even anger) over the pronunciation of chorizo, with the sausage being pronounced in three different ways: /ʃəˈriːzəʊ/, /tʃəˈriːtsəʊ/ (perhaps because people think it’s Italian?) and /tʃəˈriːθəʊ/. We seem to be able to pronounce churros, so why not the /tʃ/ of chorizo?

But perhaps we shouldn’t worry that languages are not really our forte: the English language is a melting pot of words borrowed and tweaked from others throughout the centuries, why stop adding to the mix now?

(Incidentallyforte comes from French, so why do we pronounce it as though it were Italian?!)


Isabel Tate is Dictionaries Assistant in the ELT Dictionaries department at Oxford University Press. Learning languages is her forte and, when not sipping lattes and baking lasagnes, she has taught languages in the UK, France and Italy, and biscotti-making in Peru.